Potted Herb Garden

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I’ve always wanted an herb garden in my kitchen window sill. Its a long horizontal window filled with sunlight and the perfect location for accessible fresh flavors for a meal. I just love to see green thriving growth throughout my home; in every possible window, nook and cranny. I’ve been so excited for the local farmers market season to start because I knew that instead of growing my herbs from seed I wanted to purchase the “starts” (pictured below) from a local farmer in the early season.

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Vegetable & herb “starts” are a great way to get thriving plants ready to plop into a home garden or container. Local farmers are packed with growing experience (obviously). In Northern Michigan many of our area farmers need a greenhouse and thus they have a prime growing environment with opportunity to grow from seed in early spring. Not only will the starts purchased at market often be much stronger and heartier than homegrown wiry seedlings, but you’re also supporting local farmers at a time when harvest (in Northern Michigan) is not at its peak.

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The herbs I chose for my windowsill were must haves that I use frequently, but they were also picked with intention paid to the amount of space available, companion plantings and soil profiles.

Basil- Basil is pretty much a breeze to grow, but it thrives in well-drained soil so be certain that you choose a pot with drainage holes (a necessity for nearly every potted plant)

Rosemary & Thyme- These two are a great pair, they both prefer a coarse textured, well-drained and sandy soil. Mixing in gravel with your ordinary potting mix can  help to keep the roots from getting waterlogged.

Sage & Chives- This pair of herbs are happy in an ordinary well-drained potting soil.

Lemon Balm- Lemon Balm is a member of the mint family. It adds a great lemon flavor to teas and pairs well with fruit. Just as mint grows in clumps and spreads quickly, lemon balm needs to be kept in a container by itself or it may overtake its companions.

Oregano- Another herb that is characteristic of rapid, spreading growth, oregano (marjoram) should be put in a container on its own.

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If you’ve always wanted a fresh herb garden like I have, now is the time! Pick your favorites, research their soil preference and go get ’em! The best part is that you can have these little green, bountiful beauties all year long. The portability of herbs in a container only amplifies the fact that they’re a great and inexpensive investment. All of this new growth and windowsill garden planting has got me in a “Terra Cotta Craze” so don’t say I didn’t warn you.

If you’re like me pretty soon you’ll be dreaming of beautiful clay pots filled with fresh herbs.

It’s time to make your dreams a reality.

love,

tricia

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6 thoughts on “Potted Herb Garden

  1. what a good tutorial! thanks for posting :) need to remember that soil info for rosemary. and you are right about basil being a breeze – we ended up with a bush last year!

    -Haley

  2. Great post. I just got some herbs from the farmer’s market last week too! It’s really fun using them, I love the selection you chose, I have basil,dill, parsley, and cilantro, but would love more. I tried growing rosemary inside earlier this year but it sadly died on me. I hope yours fares better! I was also happy to see you have lemon balm,I use it almost every day in tea blends because my friend has it growing like a weed in his garden and brings me a big batch every year :)

    • Thank you! I’m so happy to hear you’re familiar with lemon balm, the scent and flavor is so light and fresh that I just absolutely adore it. All my best, and thank you for the sweet comment!

      • You’re very welcome! And yes, lemon balm is just lovely, try it in peppermint tea, or green tea for a wonderful kick. I’m sad I just used up my last batch from last summer, but there will be more eventually. Herbs are so fun :)

  3. Pingback: Raised Beds | Growth by the Season

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